Exceptional Nordic skates, handmade in Alaska

Available now on preorder

Bomb-proof durability. American-made Rc58 stainless steel blades. Aircraft-grade 6061 aluminum frame with an industrial-grade finish. Our flagship skate, the A100, is everything we want in a Nordic skate.

Alaskan-owned, Alaska-made

Ermine Skate is the result of a group of Alaskans coming together to design, manufacture, and sell premium Nordic skates in our home town of Anchorage, Alaska. Alaska’s glaciers, lakes, lagoons, and sloughs are an endless playground for Nordic skaters, and Alaska’s outdoor culture is second to none. This is the perfect place to launch North America’s first Nordic skate brand.

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What is Nordic skating?

Nordic skates are purpose-built for skating “wild ice.” Whether you find yourself racing around a backcountry lake chain, weaving between icebergs on a glacial lagoon, or just doing big lazy laps on the neighborhood pond, a day on Nordic skates rarely fails to be exciting and memorable. Compared with other types of skates, Nordic skates are fast, stable, comfortable, and warm. To learn more about Nordic skating, visit the Ermine Skate Knowledge Base.

Visit the Knowledge Base
Ermine

Meet the Ermine

The ermine (pronounced ur-min) is a member of the mustelid family that ranges across Eurasia, Greenland, and North America, including nearly all of Alaska. Small, sleek, and bold, the ermine is a ferocious hunter capable of taking prey several times its own size. Encountering a curious ermine is always a highlight of any winter walk, ski, or skate.

In the summer, an ermine is typically referred to as a stoat. The name ‘Ermine’ is used only when animals are in their white winter coats; to use an archaic phrasing, when a stoat is “in ermine.” Few animals transform so much between the seasons that their names change too. This radical seasonal transformation is also a central part of wild skating, when waterways freeze over and change from liquid water into sparkling, smooth, skateable ice.

We hope to see you out on our skates this winter, when the lakes, sloughs, and lagoons have frozen solid and the world is “in ermine.”